Printed Wood Paper Mache Lac-Turnery

Window shutter

Printed Wood Paper Mache Lac-Turnery

Window shutter. Pigment painting and lacquer on wood; 67 cm x 44 cm. Probably Jodhpur, Rajasthan. c. mid 20th century. 7/4217(1).

All over Rajasthan old buildings and palaces have beautifully painted window panels that depict scenes from local history and legends in the typical style of Rajasthani miniature painting.

Generally such window shutters have paintings executed on both sides so that both interiors as well as exteriors are equally well adorned.

Standing beneath a typical arch or mehrab, this Rajasthani woman in lehanga, or long skirt, delicately fanning at her feet and odhni, or head cloth, gracefully placed over her head, is depicted holding her son in the graceful stance of a dancer.

Opium Container

Printed Wood Paper Mache Lac-Turnery

Window shutter. Pigment painting and lacquer on wood; 67 cm x 44 cm. Probably Jodhpur, Rajasthan. c. mid 20th century. 7/4217(1).

All over Rajasthan old buildings and palaces have beautifully painted window panels that depict scenes from local history and legends in the typical style of Rajasthani miniature painting.

Generally such window shutters have paintings executed on both sides so that both interiors as well as exteriors are equally well adorned.

Standing beneath a typical arch or mehrab, this Rajasthani woman in lehanga, or long skirt, delicately fanning at her feet and odhni, or head cloth, gracefully placed over her head, is depicted holding her son in the graceful stance of a dancer.

Gun Powder Case

Printed Wood Paper Mache Lac-Turnery

Kuppi, gunpowder case. Pigment and varnish on wood and gourd; 24 cm x 36 cm. Rajasthan. c. early 20th century. 7/3090.

Gun powder cases, like this one, with a long carved spout and originally with small lid, were hung on the waist by warriors or travellers.

The subtle floral ornamentation on the “battle” accessory is a respite from the otherwise severe function of the artefact, a practice typical of Rajasthan desert art.

Ganagor

Printed Wood Paper Mache Lac-Turnery

Ganagor, local form of goddess Parvati, consort of god Shiva. Pigment and varnish on wood; 71 cm x 24 cm. Rajasthan. c. mid 20th century. 84/6727.

The Ganagor festival1 in Rajasthan is celebrated by women in honour of Gouri, the goddess of abundance and consort of Shiva, by women during “the vernal equinox, when nature in these regions proximate to the tropic is in the full expanse of her charms and the matronly Gouri casts her golden mantle over the beauties of the verdant Vassanti (personification of spring).”

The meaning of Gouri is ‘yellow’, emblematic of the ripened harvest, when the votaries of the goddess adore her effigies, which are those of a matron painted the colour of ripe corn; and though her image is represented with only two hands, in one of which she holds the lotus… yet not unfrequently they equip her with the warlike conch, the discus, and the club, to denote that the goddess, whose gifts sustain life, is likewise accessory to the loss of it….”

The rites commence when the sun enters Aries (the opening of the Hindu year), by a deputation to a spot beyond the city, ‘to bring earth for the image of Gouri’. When this is formed, a smaller one of Iswara is made, and they are placed together; a small trench is then excavated in which barley is sown; the ground is irrigated and artificial heat supplied till the grain germinates, when the females join hands and dance round it, invoking the blessings of Gouri on their husbands. The young corn is then taken up, distributed, and presented by the females to the men who wear it in their turbans.”

1. Also see Cat. No. IV/4
2. Tod, 1957, Vol. I, p.454
3.Ibid, p.454-5
4. Ibid, p.455

Box

Printed Wood Paper Mache Lac-Turnery

Box. Polychromed and varnished wood; 7 cm x 46 cm x 23 cm. Sawantwadi, Maharashtra. Contemporary. 87/I/D.

This rectangular box, painted in the traditional style by the chitrakars or painters of Sawantwadi, depicts lord Ganesha being attended by female fly-whisk bearers and attendants clad in sarees worn in the Maharashtrian style.

The bright yellow and red colours, along with the floral creeper on the edges are typical of the work in the region.